Store Jewelry Safely | Diamond Source of Virginia

Remember that diamonds can scratch other materials, even diamonds.

  • Jewelry storage boxDo not put diamond jewelry items together where they might scratch each other.
  • Soft stones like pearls, opals and emeralds can easily be scratched if mixed with other jewelry.
  • Keep your precious pieces in a fabric-lined jewel case, or a box with compartments or dividers. If you prefer to use ordinary boxes, wrap each piece individually in tissue paper.
  • Do not store pearls in plastic bags since this will dull their surface.

Never trust putting jewelry in your pockets. Even pockets with zippers can be susceptible to opening or have a hole in the bottom.

Don’t leave your ring on the rim of a sink when you remove it to wash your hands. It can easily slip down the drain.

Pottery-Barn-Jewelry-storageWhen not wearing jewelry, put it in a secure place, such as a home safe or safe-deposit box. Jewelry boxes and dresser drawers, as well as almost any other spot in bedrooms, are probably the first places a thief will look for your valuables.

Be careful of your hiding place if others in your house are not aware of it. Hiding jewelry in the refrigerator is not a wise idea if someone mistakenly throws out that container.

via www.diamondsourceva.com


Nearly 28-Carat Pink Diamond Found in Russia

Alrosa-27.85 carat pinkMoscow--Alrosa reported this week that subsidiary Almazy Anabara has recovered what is by far the largest pink diamond in company history.

Weighing 27.85 carats, the rough diamond has dimensions of 22.47 x 15.69 x 10.9 mm, and is described by the company as being “of gem-quality and almost free of inclusions.”

Prior to this find, Alrosa said the biggest pink diamond it had ever recovered was 3.86 carats. That too was discovered by Almazy Anabara, which recovers pink and other natural color diamonds at the Severalmaz kimberlite pipes and placer deposits.

Apart from that stone, which was found in 2012, Alrosa has found only three pink diamonds weighing more than 2 carats over the last eight years.

This week’s news of the recovery of a nearly 28-carat high-quality pink follows the company’s August unveiling of the five polished diamonds it cut from a colorless 179-carat piece of rough it found in 2015 and dubbed “The Romanovs” diamond.

The largest of the stones is a 51.38-carat round brilliant, D color, VVS1 clarity diamond with triple excellent cut. Called “The Dynasty,” it is the biggest stone of this quality ever cut by the company.

Commenting on The Dynasty, Alrosa said: “This stone gives a start to a new stage in the development of Alrosa’s cutting division that will actively develop polishing of extra-large and colored diamonds. The Dynasty demonstrated that we can do it at the highest level.”

But whether the company will apply these cutting skills to the newly discovered pink diamond remains to be seen.

In a news release issued Thursday, Evgeny Agureev, the head of USO (United Selling Organization) Alrosa, said the company’s polishing division is examining the diamond in order to decide whether to cut it or sell it rough.

“Large stones, particularly colored, are always in demand at auctions. But if the company decided to cut it, it would become the most expensive diamond in the entire history of Alrosa,” he said.

via www.nationaljeweler.com


Clean Your Jewelry | Diamond Source of Virginia

Learn the proper cleaning process for each jewelry item since different gemstones and metals have different characteristics.

  • Metal and stones used in costume jewelry are generally not as durable as most fine jewelry.
  • When in question about a particular type of gemstone or metal type, a quick online search for cleaning that item online will probably provide the specific guidance you need.
  • Ultrasonic cleanerA home ultrasonic cleaner can be used for diamond, ruby, sapphire, citrine, blue topaz, peridot, aquamarine, garnet, and amethyst.
  • A home ultrasonic cleaner or harsh abrasive cleaner should not be used for pearl, opal, emerald, tourmaline, Tanzanite, turquoise, amber coral or onyx.
  • Metal watch bands can be cleaned with an ultrasonic cleaner but be careful not to put the watch mechanism under water even if says it is water resistant.

Hand creamAvoid touching cleaned diamonds with your fingers as the oil from your skin can cloud the stones. This is especially true if you have hand cream or moisturizer on your hands. Oil and hair products can also coat diamond earrings so they should be cleaned regularly to stay bright and sparkly.

Beware that some do-it-yourself remedies like witch hazel, bleach, vinegar, and baking soda can damage your jewelry

Red, white or blue jewelry (rubies, diamonds, sapphires) with gold or platinum metals are relatively durable for cleaning.

The best homemade jewelry cleaning solution is a mixture of a few drops of Dawn dish detergent in warm water. Soap the jewelry item in the solution for a few minutes and then brush with a soft tooth brush, rinse in clean warm water, then dry with paper towel or lint-free clean cloth.

Jewelry cleaner kitYou can also buy one of the brand-name liquid jewelry cleaners online or in most department stores, which usually include a container of cleaner, a basket to soak the ring in and a small brush to clean hard to get at areas. Read the label and follow its instructions.

Frequent cleaning with a soapy solution and soft brush will ensure oils, creams, food, and other dirt does not build up and harden. Keep the container of cleane

via www.diamondsourceva.com


Know When Not to Wear Jewelry | Diamond Source of Virginia

Regardless of the materials used in your jewelry, it is delicate.  Knowing when not to wear jewelry is a key element for taking care of your jewelry.

  • Exercise equipment-smAvoid jewelry when playing sports and gym workouts. We are seeing many bent rings that are the result of being worn while using exercise equipment like weight machines, treadmills, or stationary bikes.
  • Avoid jewelry when working in the garden. Working with bare hands means rings are exposed to dirt and chemicals. Working with gloves can coat the ring with the materials inside the gloves and contact with tools.
  • Avoid jewelry when cleaning home. Cleaning chemicals can have adverse effects on jewelry. Polishing furniture with spray wax means your ring is getting waxed too. Operating vacuum cleaners, carrying buckets, and dusting will have your ring getting dirty and abuse.
  • No-swimmingAvoid jewelry when in water with chlorine (hot tubs, swimming). While some gemstones like diamonds can withstand some chlorine, the metal holding those gemstones can become corroded and too weak to hold the stones.
  • Wait to put on jewelry after make-up, hair spray, hair products, hand cream and perfume which can damage or form a coating on jewelry
  • Dish-washing2Diamonds naturally attract grease. When you put your hand and ring in dishwater, the oils, food, and other materials are going to collect on the ring. Doing dishes also means your hands are encountering hard services like the sink, counter tops and pots & pans.

Think before you wear jewelry and you will avoid many of the problems that can damage or dull your jewelry.

Edit

via www.diamondsourceva.com


The Differences Between Men and Women

GuysThe differences between men and women have been made famous by author, John Gray, in his book Men Are From Mars, Women Are From Venus. Over the many years we have been selling diamonds, we have observed the difference between Martians and Venusians is never greater than when it comes to a diamond purchase.

GalsWe wrote two articles in 1999 when we first created our web site and the words and importance have not changed since then.

Click the icons above to go to this information on our web site.

 


Jewelry Insurance

Jewelry InsuredAfter you have purchased that special diamond, there is still one more important step to ensure your future happiness. That step is to adequately insure your diamond against loss or damage. Next to an automobile, many first time diamond buyers find this is the largest personal property purchase of their life.

Things happen that are out of your control, so it’s important to purchase ring insurance for extra peace of mind. It’s also important to sign up for this coverage right away! You have two options when purchasing insurance; you can get an extension or “rider” on your current renters/homeowners insurance, or you can purchase insurance through your jeweler from a third party such as Jewelers Mutual.

Ring rider insurance – Renters or homeowners insurance generally covers items in your home, but does not take into account high value items such as engagement rings. Rider insurance will cover these items for an additional fee. This insurance option is very common and may qualify you for a cheaper rate through customer discounts or because you have multiple types of insurance.

Third party insurance – If you don’t have a renters or homeowners policy, you can purchase insurance through your jeweler. Advantages of this type of insurance include having individuals knowledgeable about insuring jewelry right at your fingertips and more comprehensive coverage that takes into account the unique characteristics of your ring. Both types of insurance require you to submit an appraisal.

Before deciding which policy to purchase, ask the following:

  • Is my ring covered if something happens accidentally? Does it have to be stolen? Is there a reason my ring wouldn’t be replaced?
  • How will my ring be replaced? Do I get a check or do I have to go to a particular jeweler?
  • Do I have to “prove” the ring is missing?
  • Is the full cost of my ring insured?

For a free, no-obligation quote go to www.jewelersmutualinfo.com where you can enter our Jeweler Code A00108 and get estimated annual premiums based on the retail replacement value of your items, the deductible for each item, and the location of the person who will wear the jewelry.

Check out Jeweler's Mutual on facebook


New Special Offers

Check out some of the new Special Offers we have available at Diamond Source of Virginia.

PR-1.15-E-VS2-1Princess cut diamond with 1.15-carat weight graded E color, VS2 clarity, depth 72.0%, table 74%, Very Good polish, Good symmetry, No fluorescence, measurements 5.87 x 5.79 x 4.17 mm, ratio 1.01 (ref: GIA 14278752, dated 5/26/2017, laser inscribed “GIA 14278752”)

DSCN7571smRound brilliant cut diamond with 2.66-carat weight and graded I color, SI1 clarity, depth 60.5%, table 56%, Excellent polish, Excellent symmetry, No fluorescence, measurements 9.01 x 9.06 x 5.47 mm (ref: GIA 12789921, dated 11/15/2004)

Click here to see the Special Offers diamond rings and loose diamonds...

 

 


Tennis ball-sized 'diamond in the rough' too big to sell

Lesidi La Roma-1TORONTO (Reuters) - In the mysterious world of diamond mining, it turns out that some stones are too big to sell.

Canada's Lucara Diamond Corp will have to cut its tennis ball-sized rough diamond to find a buyer, industry insiders say, following Sotheby's failed auction for the world's largest uncut stone last summer.

It's not the ending that William Lamb wanted for his 1,109-carat stone, named 'Lesedi La Rona', or 'Our Light' in the national language of Botswana where it was mined.

"It's only the second stone recovered in the history of humanity over 1,000 carats. Why would you want to polish it?," said Lucara's chief executive.

"The stone in the rough form contains untold potential...As soon as you polish it into one solution, everything else is gone."

Lamb had gambled that ultra-rich collectors, who buy and sell precious art works for record-breaking sums at auction, would do the same with a diamond in the raw.

The unprecedented bet failed.

Bidding for the 2.5 to 3 billion year old stone stalled at $61 million - short of the $70 million reserve.

Lesidi La Roma-2"When is a diamond too big? I think we have found that when you go above 1,000 carats, it is too big - certainly from the aspect of analyzing the stones with the technology available," said Panmure Gordon mining analyst Kieron Hodgson.

"At the end of the day, it's about understanding what the stone can produce. And the industry now doesn't work on hunches as much as it used to 20-30 years ago."

An arcane business, the diamond industry has no spot market trading, no guarantee that 'roughs' will yield any value, and a punishing grading system that can dramatically swing values.

Stones in the hundreds of carats come with additional risk, from the multi-million-dollar price tags and cutting process that can take months or years, to capricious customer demand.

There is a "very, very small universe" of companies with the skill, money and network to polish and sell the Lesedi, which will likely take two to four days for the first laser cut, said Lamb.

But after Lucara's public auction, potential buyers now know what the market is willing to pay, said Edahn Golan, of Edahn Golan Diamond Research & Data. "Maybe it's worth waiting a couple of years," he said.

While Lucara does not need the money, investors may not have that patience.

Lamb said the unsold stone "weighs heavily" on the stock, which is down more than 30 percent from late last year.

To be sure, Lucara has seen other benefits from the stone, said independent diamond analyst Paul Zimnisky.

"There's the value of a particular diamond, but then there's also a story behind the second-largest rough diamond ever recovered in modern time," he said.

"Just from a publicity standpoint, nobody knew what Lucara Diamond was when they recovered that stone ... now they're probably one of the most recognized names."

Lamb, a former De Beers executive, says it's unlikely Lucara can sell the stone for its desired price and polishing the Lesedi itself is risky.

Another option is for the Vancouver-based miner to partner with one or more companies to cut and sell the stone. "We've already done our homework," Lamb said. "You don't take a stone like this and give it to the second best."

Industry sources agree that high-profile British diamond dealer Laurence Graff makes the list of potential partners, but beyond that, opinions vary.

Lucara could work with a consortium, sources said, including Cora International, Diamcad, the so-called 'King of Diamonds' Lev Leviev, Mouawad, Tache Diamonds, Optimum Diamonds, the Angolan President's daughter Isobel dos Santos, Swissdiam International and Rare Diamond House (RDH).

It would be a mistake for Lucara to hold onto the Lesedi, said Oded Mansori, RDH managing director. "Maybe next week, there will be a larger stone."

Lesidi La Roma-3New technology means miners like Gem Diamonds, Lucapa Diamond, Petra Diamonds and Letseng Diamonds are unearthing more mega-stones intact rather than breaking the brittle crystals.

Lucara, which installed a Large Diamond Recovery machine, using X-ray transmission sensors (XRT), recovered the Lesedi, an 813-carat and 374-carat stone over two days.

A Dubai trading company paid a record $63 million for Lucara's 813-carat 'Constellation', while Graff bought the 374-carat stone for $17.5 million.

"Miners have more advanced technology, this is why we see these large stones coming up all of a sudden," said Mansori. "I think that Mother Nature has some more surprises waiting for us."

Lamb won't take that bet.

"Don't hold your breath. There's no guarantee that there's going to be a next one," he said.

Reporting by Susan Taylor

via www.reuters.com


Diamonds.net - Letšeng Yields 126ct. Rough Diamond

Gem Diamonds Letseng 126ct rough diamondRAPAPORT... Gem Diamonds has recovered a “high-quality” rough diamond weighing 126 carats at its Letšeng mine, following a switch to a more lucrative section of the project in Lesotho, the company reported Thursday.

The D-color, type-IIa stone is the latest in a string of large discoveries at the mine, which is known for its high-value rough production. Last month, the company found a 104.73-carat, D-color, type IIa diamond and a 151.52-carat yellow diamond. In April and May, Gem Diamonds found three D-color, type IIa rough diamonds weighing 80.58 carats, 98.42 carats and 114 carats respectively.

Gem Diamonds shifted focus to the higher-grade K6 portion of Letšeng’s main pipe in the second quarter, enabling a higher rate of large-diamond discoveries, the company explained in May. This followed a slowdown in 2016, when it unearthed only five stones of 100 carats or more, dragging revenues down by 22%. 
via www.diamonds.net

What is a whopping 709-carat diamond worth? It's a mystery in Sierra Leone

FREETOWN, Sierra Leone — The recent find of a mammoth diamond the size of a hockey puck has everyone in this small West African nation wondering how big a fortune it will fetch.

Giddy talk about the gem's worth is providing a needed uplift in a country long plagued by misfortunes that include a deadly Ebola epidemic in 2013-16 and a decade-long civil war that broke out in 1991.

Even diamonds have a bad connotation here. Smugglers took advantage of the country's abundance of precious stones to sell them illegally and help finance that brutal conflict. The gems gained the name "blood diamonds" and inspired the 2006 movie Blood Diamond starring Leonardo DiCaprio.

“This diamond makes me happy even though I am not the owner,” said Mohamed Bangura, 28, a bartender on popular Lumley beach. “When I saw it being displayed on national TV by the president, I felt good that after all these years, our country is making headlines again for a good reason.”

Sierra leone mapA few years ago, this beach was deserted because of a nationwide ban on public gatherings to prevent the spread of Ebola, which killed nearly 4,000 people in Sierra Leone.

Now on a recent sunny day, people on the beach enjoy picnics and discuss how local Pastor Emmanuel Momoh found the huge diamond in May in his small mining plot in Kono, in the east. Mining is a common alternative to subsistence farming in this impoverished country.

Following a law passed to curb diamond smuggling, the pastor handed the diamond, dubbed the "Transparent Gem," to the government, which is supposed to sell it and give the proceeds to him after collecting a 3% tax.

“My fear is, how will the money be shared and spent?” Bangura asked. “Diamonds worth millions of U.S. dollars have been smuggled before and nothing happened.”

The-sierra-leone-diamondDiamond experts say the gem could be the 10th-largest ever discovered and initially pegged its value at $50 million.

A few days before the new gem was put on auction, the diamond-mining firm Lucara sold an 813-carat diamond for $63 million in London. But the top offer for the Transparent Gem was only $7.8 million at a May auction. The government rejected the bid.

“The next step is to call for an international bidding to be held either in Tel Aviv or Antwerp to ensure the right price is paid,” government spokesman Abdulai Bayraytay said, referring to major diamond centers in Israel and Belgium.

Since then, the government has refused to answer questions about the diamond. That has led to much speculation about the sale and what happens next.

Cecilia Mattia, national coordinator for a mining watchdog group, said the country's diamond wealth often has led to tragedy: Thousands have died because of illegal trade, and rebels started the civil war by seizing mining regions.

“Diamonds and other minerals have not been very helpful to Sierra Leone for some obvious reasons,” Mattia said.

Now some hope diamonds can benefit the country.

“Our district lacks good roads, no electricity and no water,” said Fanday Musa, 25, a taxi-motorcycle driver in Kono, where the pastor found the stone.

The civil war destroyed Kono and left 50,000 dead nationwide. Musa hoped Momoh, the pastor, would spend his fortune from the diamond in his community. The churchman's mines employ a handful of men, providing crucial jobs for Kono.

“It’s a shame,” Musa said. “The name Kono is known worldwide, but on reaching here you will see the deplorable ruins left behind by the war. I hope the blessing of this gem will give a face lift to my town.”

Momoh believes he and his fellow citizens will receive their windfall soon.

“I am very satisfied," he said about giving the diamond to the authorities. "I am looking forward to the government working on how to sell the diamond in the interest of Sierra Leone.”

Others were impatient. “I want this diamond to be sold now,” said taxi driver Mohamed Sall, 34, of Bo South, an inland city. “Our country needs the money badly.”

Government officials counsel patience. “In the 1990s, our country was known for blood diamonds,” said Bayraytay, the government spokesman. “This is now a golden opportunity to let the world know that Sierra Leone is back on track. This diamond will help us achieve that.”

Some also hope the diamond heals the nation after Ebola.

“This is the first time since my adult life a diamond has been given this kind of attention,” said Ramatu Turay, 35, a street vendor in Port Loko, a northern district. “I lost relatives to Ebola in 2014. But this diamond is a way of wiping tears from Sierra Leone."

Alpha Kamara, Special for USA TODAY